The Florida Everglades can evoke images of many different animal species like alligators and egrets, but not snakes so much. Among the hundreds of species of Everglades wildlife that dwell here, there are 29 species of snakes, only 4 of which are venomous. They may not stand out like a roseate spoonbill or a bull alligator, but you could spot one lurking in the marshes and tree islands on an everglades airboat tour.

The Everglades offers the exciting opportunity for all visitors to see a unique environment and the animals that live there up close and in person. Like the other wildlife here, snakes play a vital role in the ecosystems of the Everglades. Whether you’re looking to visit the ‘glades, are just curious about Everglades snakes, and maybe wondering which ones to avoid, here’s some information about these reptiles.

Non-Venomous Everglades Snakes

Red rat snake these constrictors can climb trees and are found in hardwood hammocks. Their reddish-orange to brownish-yellow patterning outlined in black makes them easy to spot. But, they’re known to spend time underground mostly.

Eastern Garter Snake Averaging at 18-26 inches long, these snakes are recognized by the three yellow stripes that run down their bodies. They prefer moist areas like the sawgrass marshes to feed on small frogs, fish, and salamanders.

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Red Rat Snake

Scarlet King Snake This snake bears a strong resemblance to the highly venomous coral snake, but is distinguished by its red, pointy nose. It gets its royal name because it can eat venomous snakes without being affected by their venom.

Burmese Python This exotic invasive species has recently passed the American Alligator as the apex predator of the Everglades. With an average length of 10 – 18 feet, the Burmese python is the third largest living snake in the world! These snakes arrived in the Everglades as abandoned pets.

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Burmese Python

Venomous Everglades Snakes

As was mentioned earlier, there are only 4 species of venomous snakes that reside in the Everglades.

Coral Snake A pretty sight to behold, the coral snake is a bright and colorful blend of red, black, and yellow. Preferring to stay underground, they are rarely spotted and difficult to see. Though they account for less than 1% of all snake bites, the coral snake is highly venomous.

Pygmy Rattlesnake pygmy rattlesnakes have thick, greyish bodies with dark blotches on their backs, making them hard to spot. They are among the smaller species of rattlesnakes, averaging between 14-22 inches long. Pygmy rattlesnakes prefer swamps and sawgrass marshes, but can be found in other habitats.

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Coral Snake

Florida Cottonmouth Also known as the water moccasin, the Florida Cottonmouth is the only venomous water snake in North America. The Florida Cottonmouth can be identified by the dark bands that run down from each eye and their dark reddish to greyish, thick bodies. These strong swimmers are found in other habitats.

Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake Reaching up to 7 – 8 feet long, the Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake is the largest venomous snake in North America. They are tan to greyish with a black diamond pattern on their backs, and their tails are tipped with a large rattle. Diamondback Rattlesnakes can be found in the drier habitats of the Everglades, like sandhills are hammocks.

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As menacing as they may look to some, snakes play their part in the Everglades food web. Everglades snakes regulate insect and rodent populations, and even other venomous snakes by eating them! Though they are often shy, you’re likely to see them among the many other varieties of wildlife on an Everglades airboat tour at Mack’s Fish camp.